How to keep your forest green in New Zealand

Posted September 06, 2018 06:36:54 As the climate warms, the demand for timber in the North Island and the Tasmanian bush is set to soar.

This is according to a report by timber processing giant Riga Timber Processing.

The report, published in the latest issue of the journal Forest and Environment Research, found that the North Coast is expected to become one of the largest areas in the world to harvest timber within the next decade.

The number of applications for timber harvesting in New England is expected in the next few years to surpass that in the rest of the country, which accounts for just over half of all applications for the year.

The study found that about 70 per cent of the applications made in the Cape Breton region, with the remainder made in New South Wales, Tasmania, the Pilbara, the Kimberley and New South Ireland were for logging.

Riga’s head of sustainability, John Wollaston, said the study showed how the timber industry was adapting to the changing climate.

“We can’t afford to sit on our hands and wait for that demand to increase again. “

“As our climate warps, we need to ensure that we’re keeping our forests green and we need that workforce to be able to do that.” “

Riga has been working with government, environmental and industry groups to improve the quality of timber harvested in New York state since it was founded in 1988. “

As our climate warps, we need to ensure that we’re keeping our forests green and we need that workforce to be able to do that.”

Riga has been working with government, environmental and industry groups to improve the quality of timber harvested in New York state since it was founded in 1988.

It is the only company that processes timber on the North American continent and the only one in the United States.

It was the first company in New World to begin to process timber in New Hampshire, and the first to do so in North Carolina.

The company now processes more than 100,000 tonnes of wood each year.

Mr Wollaston said the company’s focus was on getting timber harvested on the coast of New Zealand.

“Our main focus is on North America because that’s where we are located, and we are hoping to grow in the Pacific and in the South Pacific and beyond,” he said.

Mr Nye said it was good to see more and more companies using the process to improve their products.

“I think it’s good to start to see a little bit more of that, because it’s an important part of the sustainability agenda,” he told ABC Radio New Zealand’s The Story.

“You can’t sit there and wait it’s going to grow back to where it was in the 1960s.”

It’s a huge problem, and I think we’re just going to have to start looking at it a little more seriously and be more proactive.

“The paper, titled “Trends in North American Wood Processing in the 2030s”, looked at the production of timber in North America from 1900 to the present.

The trend shows that timber processing is set for a growth spurt and the number of application applications for forestry has been on a constant increase since the 1960-70s.

The average annual rate of applications rose from 9 per cent in the 1950s to almost 10 per cent today.

“This increase in application applications is a result of the expansion of the timber processing industry in the region.” “

The trends in North Atlantic Canada and the northern New England region have seen the largest increase in applications since the 1970s,” the paper said.

“This increase in application applications is a result of the expansion of the timber processing industry in the region.”

The report also found a “significant” increase in the number and value of the forests logged.

The research showed that the region’s forests are now worth an estimated $8.7 billion and the average value of timber logging was $2.7 million.

The North American forests are worth about $50 billion each year, the report said.