A timber processing plant could generate hundreds of thousands of tonnes of carbon dioxide per year

New Scientist article A new paper published in the journal Science looks at how a timber manufacturing facility can emit hundreds of millions of tonnes per year of CO2.

“It’s a very big issue,” said Professor Daniel Stahl from the University of Adelaide, lead author of the study.

In the paper, Professor Stahl and his team compared CO2 emissions from a large wood-processing plant to a single-mansion house on the outskirts of Adelaide. “

So the question is how much CO2 is being released by the timber processing facility, and what happens to it if you release it into the atmosphere.”

In the paper, Professor Stahl and his team compared CO2 emissions from a large wood-processing plant to a single-mansion house on the outskirts of Adelaide.

“This is a single house with four bedrooms and a backyard,” he said.

“But this has a timber processing equipment on site.”

The researchers looked at CO2 levels in a region that was just a few kilometres away from the site of the new house, and found that the timber plant emitted up to 5 million tonnes of CO3 per year.

The study used climate model simulations to project what CO2 would be emitted if the forest were completely destroyed.

The authors found that if the timber industry were allowed to continue, the emissions could potentially exceed the emissions from just one residential building.

“I’m not saying we’d be emitting twice as much CO3 in a forest as the industry would be emitting,” Professor Stahls said.

While the paper didn’t look at all existing timber processing facilities, Professor Sallman said the results are important. “

We found that it was going to be a large part of the emissions, and we found that in the region around the [new] timber processing site, the wood processing would probably have a much higher emissions.”

While the paper didn’t look at all existing timber processing facilities, Professor Sallman said the results are important.

“There’s a lot of potential for this kind of process to be built in a timber-processing site, and there are very significant economic and environmental implications,” he told the ABC.

The research team also found that there was an overlap between the CO2 emitted from a single timber-production facility and the emissions emitted from the wood-cutting industry, and that in some cases, the timber-cutting company emitted significantly more CO2 than the timber process.

“The question is what happens in terms of how much carbon does this timber processing company release,” Professor Sillman said.

If you like this story, you may also like: